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Why women won’t apply for IT jobs

Women won’t apply for IT jobs unless they are certain they meet every single criterion for the gig, according to John Ridge, Executive Director of the Australian Computer Society Foundation Trust Fund (ACSF).

Ridge and the ACSF run a national Work Integrated Learning scholarship scheme for IT workers in Australia and have, over the scheme’s ten years of operations, placed 3,850 workers in one-year gigs designed to bridge between the worlds of university and work. The scholarships are designed to make it cheaper and easier for employers to hire entry-level staff, while giving graduates the chance to learn practical skills in the workplace and, often, to upgrade their university-taught technical knowledge to modern skills real businesses actually use.

The scholarship scheme struggles to attract women, largely due to pitifully low enrolment rates in Australian universities. Ridge also mentioned horrifying drop-out rates for women in IT courses, citing research conducted by the University of Wollongong that he said found 72.9% of women are unhappy with the IT courses they pursue.

The few women that do pursue a career in IT, he said, are then reluctant to seek opportunities like ACSF scholarships because they feel it is important to meet every single criterion an employer desires. Men, by contrast, happily apply with only half the skills an employer lists as desirable.

“Industry wants women,” Ridge said. “But women talk themselves out of applying for jobs”.

Credit to Simon Sharwood and The Register for the original content.

Remember to keep an eye on the jobs page over at The Register, it’s a great resource;

http://www.theregister.co.uk/jobs/

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10 things I wish I’d known before becoming an IT consultant

Takeaway: Careful research, thoughtful planning, and honest self-assessment can help you make a successful leap into the IT consultant role. But the realities of the job will still surprise you.

 

Before opening an IT consultancy, I did my homework. I interviewed lifelong consultants. I read books. I even took personality tests to confirm that my psychological constitution matched the challenges I’d face as an entrepreneur owning and operating my own business.

Some lessons, though, you just have to learn yourself. If you’re a technology consultant, or if you’re considering branching out on your own, take a few tips from my experience of supporting hundreds of companies of all shapes and sizes. Here are 10 things I’d wish I’d known before becoming an IT consultant.

By Erik Eckel

1: Some people are never happy

2: Not all IT pros make good consultants

3: Some clients never intend to pay

4: Vendors abandon you

5: Clients expect a know-it-all

6: And one more thing…

7: Immediate service, but 60-day payment terms

8: Clients only remember what didn’t work

9: You’re almost always working

10: Follow-up is not optional

Check out the full post for all the detail.

Credit to TechRepublic for the original article.

 


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How CIOs are hiring and engaging with staff

Whether blogging about their area of expertise or tweeting about business best practice, more CIOs are choosing to express their views through collaborative technology.

More senior IT leaders are beginning to dabble in social media and are finding new ways to help the business. So, where will social CIOs go next? Do IT leaders use social media to attract potential employees and do they use collaborative tools to keep new workers engaged?

JJ Van Oosten is an experienced IT leader, and former board member and CIO at Tesco.com, who believes LinkedIn and Facebook are very useful tools for recruiting potential staff. He pays particular attention to LinkedIn, drawing on his experience at large firms which suggests employees across all ranks of the business are connected through LinkedIn.

“The inhouse recruitment team does need to understand and create an excellent LinkedIn presence,” he said, referring to the need for human resources to take a structured approach to sourcing via social media. “The best talent is global, mobile and well connected. LinkedIn should play an essential part of building a good brand as an employer.”

Van Oosten said he has less personal experience of Facebook being used in a recruitment context. However, he can think of ways the tool could help. “If I had to recruit some developers, or other new talent in marketing, I could imagine organising some cool, interactive and rich events,” he said, before also suggesting that social networking can provide a strong hook for acquiring new talent.

You can read the full article on techrepublic here;

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/linkedin-twitter-facebook-how-cios-are-hiring-and-engaging-with-staff/39747318