Your Job List


Leave a comment

Job Search – Have you got the I.T. factor?

Latest figures show that the numbers of people employed in the UK are the highest since records began.  Forecasts, both short and long-term, show that the total is expected to remain on an upward curve, with the rate of unemployment quite stable at around 6%.  Freelancing and other forms of self-employment are also rising fast. So there is plenty of work out there, especially for people with the requisite skills, experience and qualifications.

Although some view this as unhealthy, London remains the powerhouse of the UK economy as evidenced by a recent report which found that the capital had ten times the number of job vacancies than other major UK cities. Job creation in London in recent years has been extremely positive, both in the public and private sectors and the expectation is that this will continue.  The situation nationally is patchier, with some regions seeing net job losses in both sectors. So London remains the place to be.

Hiring is currently buoyant within IT, in the Financial Services sector for example. One reason is the renewed confidence as the economic outlook is becoming more positive. An increase in data and software development projects has led to consistent demand for suitably qualified professionals. And of course, change is a constant feature of the IT industry; nothing stays the same for very long.

Job hunting can be hard work - use an online tool!

Job hunting can be hard work – use an online tool!

A CV is of course a vitally important tool for anyone applying for jobs, especially in IT. Effectively, it is your marketing brochure. It needs to be a comprehensive, sharp but concise and professional document.  Preparing a CV will also often help a candidate to identify gaps in their qualifications, gaps which they can set about filling.  Prospective employers will be impressed if they see you are adding to your qualifications.

Not surprisingly, given the nature of IT work, the most common method of job hunting in this sector is to use the internet, and in particular to apply for positions via online websites, such as YourJobList.com. This can be extremely useful in providing a one-stop solution to job searching and it also often contains helpful blogs dealing with numerous practical issues, for example how to handle gaps in your CV.

One important benefit to be found on YourJobList.com is that all the major recruitment agencies are listed in one convenient place and you can add more that are relevant to your circumstances. This is especially useful in the modern market as fewer and fewer companies advertise jobs directly.

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Top 10 Career Management blogs of 2012

See what Tech Republic Career Management blog postings captured the most attention in 2012;

1.  Top IT skills wanted for 2012

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/top-it-skills-wanted-for-2012/3503

2.  Six lines your boss should never cross

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/six-lines-your-boss-should-never-cross/4196

3.  Questions you should never ask in an interview

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/questions-you-should-never-ask-in-an-interview/4627

4.  Four things that make your resume look dated

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/four-things-that-make-your-resume-look-dated/3993

5.  Sitting at your desk could be killing you

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/sitting-at-your-desk-could-be-killing-you/4671

6.  Four email types that can drive you crazy

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/four-email-types-that-can-drive-you-crazy/3953

7.  What is the best font to use in a resume?

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/what-is-the-best-font-to-use-in-a-resume/4331

8.  Certifications most likely to land you a new job

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/certifications-most-likely-to-land-you-a-new-job/3969

9.  Infographic: The tell-tale signs of an overworked employee

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/infographic-the-tell-tale-signs-of-an-overworked-employee/4270

10.  The three most dangerous management behaviors that you probably don’t know you’re doing

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/career/the-three-most-damaging-management-behaviors-that-you-probably-dont-know-youre-doing/4640


Leave a comment

The worst mistake you can make in a new job?

Don’t let your enthusiasm take over when starting a new job. Here’s what you should avoid in order to get off on the right foot.

There are lots of mistakes you can make in a new job-showing up late on your first day, making personal phone calls all day, and wearing a tutu all qualify as bad steps. But those are all, at least I hope, pretty obvious to you.

The worst thing you can do, and it’s a mistake a lot of people do out of enthusiasm, is to storm into a new workplace and start making suggestions for improvement. While you may expect a new employer and all of your co-workers to stop in their tracks and exalt in your keen perception, it won’t happen that way.

Here’s an unrelated story to explain: A couple of years ago I was at a party at which I was to meet the new girlfriend of a dear friend of mine. This woman happened to be a hairstylist, who for some reason, was eager to make a good impression on me. About five minutes into the evening, she pointed at me and said, “I can fix that.” I must have looked perplexed because then she said, “Your hair. I can fix it.” Now, maybe it’s me but I’m not sure how a statement like that could be received any way but poorly. I just mumbled something about my not being aware my hair was broken.

So, now I’m not saying you’re going to charge into the CIO’s office and tell him his hair is all wrong. But criticizing (which is what you’re doing by offering a “better” way) a business process that has long been in place can feel like the same thing. You cannot expect someone, even an entity like an employer, to be gracious when told indirectly that they’ve been doing things all wrong.

This is not to say that the time will not come for your insights. It will. But it’s more important to learn the lay of the prevailing land before you presume to suggest changes. It’s also important that you prove yourself first so that others will take your suggestions more seriously.

Credit to the guys at TechRepublic for the original article.


Leave a comment

Salary Guide (from The IT Job Board)

Are you earning enough?

The average salary of IT professionals is always changing. If your skills are in demand you could be earning more. Take a look at this easy to read,
free salary guide from the folks at The IT Job Board and see if you could be getting paid more.

With the 2012 salary guide you’ll be able to see:

  • Average permanent IT salaries by skill
  • Average contract daily rates by skill
  • Average contract hourly rates by skill
  • Year on year increase or decrease

Check it out here – http://www.theitjobboard.co.uk/browse/salary-guide-2012/en/


Leave a comment

Agile Careers

If you’re a software developer looking for work then this news might be of interest to you. The Scrum Alliance have announced their partnership with Agile Careers; a careers website aimed at agile practitioners.

 

AgileCareers.com is the only careers website dedicated exclusively to the needs of the Agile community, offering job posting and resume services as well as an interactive community which broadcasts news articles and information relevant to Agile and Scrum practitioners.

This partnership provides Scrum Alliance members (i.e. certified Scrum practitioners) with valuable benefits:

  • Scrum Alliance members seeking new employees can post open positions on AgileCareers.com with the confidence they will be viewed by Agile and Scrum enthusiasts worldwide.
  • Scrum Alliance members seeking new Agile career opportunities have greater visibility into potential positions with companies who desire Agile and Scrum expertise. Visit AgileCareers.com to post your résumé.

To celebrate our new partnership, AgileCareers.com is offering free postings for a limited time. After that, Scrum Alliance members will enjoy ongoing discounts for all AgileCareers.com job posting services.

Check it out and let me know what you think?


Leave a comment

Interview techniques that get results, from HP

Do you think first impressions are accurate, or are you often surprised by how people turn out to be?

If you’re interviewing someone for a job, for example, or an agency to work on a project, how can you judge them on the basis of a short interview? The fact is, until you’ve spent time with someone, it’s difficult to find out what they are “really like”.

Luckily, communication skills can help. And, of course, they can be used in all social situations.

1. First impressions aren’t always right
Quite often we judge people within the first few minutes of meeting them.  But don’t be too influenced by first impressions. What people look like, what they’re wearing, their accents and their haircuts can tell you a lot – but they certainly don’t tell the whole story.

Interview situation: To get below the surface of someone in a short time, it’s essential to approach them with an open mind. Make a list of the character stereotypes you’re influenced by – such as, “people who wear glasses are clever” or “fat people are easy-going and happy” – and then think about how rational these preconceptions really are. If you form a negative first impression just because of the way they look or speak, you might miss the fact that they are experienced and professional and would do a great job in your team.

2. Relax and smile
Most of us are a bit shy when we meet new people. So if someone has a sweaty handshake, sits right on the edge of their chair and seems ill at ease, it probably just means they don’t feel comfortable in the social situation. To put them at their ease, show you’re interested in them; talk calmly and smile. Once they are relaxed, and start to trust you, they will open up and reveal more of their true nature.

Interview situation: Non-threatening body language signals help other people relax and reveal more about themselves, their personal goals and their intentions. Be aware of yourself and the impression you give: relax your face and shoulders, speak calmly, and draw them out gradually, starting with easy questions and small talk. Remember: if they seem uncomfortable, it is partly because of you.

3. Consider body language
Broadly speaking, you can see whether someone is a relaxed or a nervous type from the way they hold their body and from their facial gestures. For example, we exhibit interest and openness by directly facing the person we’re talking to, tilting our faces towards them, maintaining steady eye contact, smiling, and keeping our hands, arms and legs uncrossed. However, don’t read too much into this unless you know a person well enough to be familiar with their normal patterns. Body language is strongly based on culture: what’s normal in one culture or social group may be unacceptable in another. This is not a real science.

Interview situation: In an interview, when you have so little time, anything that can help build up an impression of a person is useful. For example, notice a few details about how they use their bodies, hands, faces and especially their eyes – do they have a confident, firm handshake or a flabby one? Is their body facing you, or turned away? Do they look at you confidently when they speak or avoid your eyes? However, remember that although we’re good at recognising facial expressions, it’s hard to tell whether these expressions are genuine or not. The best way to learn how to “read” people is to spend time in different social settings – or, as David Funder of the University of California at Riverside says: “A good judge of personality isn’t just someone who is smarter – it’s someone who gets out and spends time with people.”[1]

4. Ask follow-up questions
Asking questions is a sign of interest in another person, though in some cultures it’s more acceptable to ask direct or personal questions than in others. However, generally speaking, if you’re talking to someone and they don’t ask you a single question, then the normal conclusion to draw is that they aren’t really interested in you. To avoid giving this impression, make sure you ask questions – and then listen to the answers!

Interview situation: A good interviewer asks lots of follow-up questions and asks for explanations. So don’t be afraid to probe the applicant and press them for details: your second and third questions, the ones that get below the surface, will elicit the most revealing and honest answers. Avoid those that only need a yes/no answer. For example, you can say, “That sounds interesting. Why did you decide to do that?” or, “How did you approach that? Can you give me some examples?” or, “What happened then?” This gives the job candidate the chance to open up (and if they don’t, that will also tell you something about them).

With these basic communication skills, we can learn a great deal about other people, even if the time we can spend with them is limited. Learning to listen and to ask the right questions builds trust and encourages people to reveal their true personalities and intentions. And that way, we shouldn’t be in for too many shocks at a later date.

[1] Psychology Today, 1 May 2004

 

Credit the original author, HP. You can read the original post here.