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The Anatomy of a Great Resume

Check out this great infographic. Lot’s of great tips!

anatomy-great-resume

Credit to the guys at Top Counseling Schools.

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Goldman Sachs Career Quiz

Would you make the cut ?

How it works:

Answer a few questions – all multiple choice with no wrong answers. The questions will ask you about your educational background, as well as how you approach challenges and solve problems.

You will not need to provide your name, as this isn’t an application for employment.

Based on your answers, the firm will suggest a short list of Goldman Sachs divisions that may suit your skills and interests.

Goldman Sachs Career Quiz


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Co-Workers From Hell

Yep, we all have our horror stories about co-workers from hell.

Well, PayScale.com pinged their users on the worst co-workers they’ve ever had and man, did they get an earful!

I once had a co-worker who clipped his nails at his desk. I am still not over the horror of it all. To this day, the sound of a clipper is still like that screeching sound during the shower scene in “Psycho.”

I had another co-worker who was so universally disliked, other co-workers would Tweet “__^__ ” when she was approaching, meaning — “shark in the water.”

Here are some of the “hygiene horrors” PayScale heard about:

  • “This one lady always burped and clipped her fingernails. Gag!”
  • “One word: farting. Uncontrollable, incessant farting.”
  • “Coughing up phlegm all morning long. Gross!”
  • “There was once a discussion from the staff about buying the business owner a gift basket of mouth care products. This person’s breath was somewhere between annoyance and horror.”

They also found a whole lot of unprofessional, lazy and obnoxious behavior:

  • “I actually worked with a girl who wore house shoes and sweats that said ‘juicy’ on the butt — then she wondered why clients didn’t take her seriously or respect her. Also, lazy people drive me nuts, and Debbie-Downers. Womp-womp.”
  • “A male coworker called all the women he worked with ‘girl’. ‘Hey girl’ only works for Ryan Gosling, and only if I don’t work with him.”
  • “I had a coworker once who was nearly crazy (passive aggressive, played the victim, just an emotional basket case). I also had the joy of having the office next to her. One day, about 3PM, I hear someone playing a mandolin in her office. It was her. She had to practice she said. I couldn’t believe it.”
  • “I can’t stand passive-aggressive group e-mails, especially ones with words in ALL CAPS.”

The Internet is loaded with complaints about co-workers – the oglers, the combative types and the perpetual victims.

On JobSchmob.com , one poster spoke of a co-worker who spoke down every day and doublechecked everything the employee did and then went one better – er, worse – and went to the boss and said this person didn’t know what they were doing.

On Askville.Amazon.com , one fed-up employee said a co-worker from Hell “stole my work, called me names in the hall, let the air out of my tires, and scuttled any program I tried to start. She got her job by being the mistress of an important man in the hierarchy.”

Another post on JobSchmob talked about a foreman who leers at her when he’s in the office. When she chirped, “What’s shakin’?” he gave a glance to her backside and said, “Looks like you are.”

Ew.

StealthGenie.com offers a list of five types of bad employees, including “The Panicker,” who is “always running around the office with steam coming out of their ears and their hair looking like they’ve just been wrestling with a wild bear…” and makes “every trivial task into a battle between good and evil where they are Luke Skywalker to the filing cabinet’s Darth Vader.”

And then there’s “The Silent Assassin.” “This was the weird guy who always ate lunch alone and quietly kept scribbling onto his notepad during meetings. This was the woman who looked like she had seen a ghost when you asked her if she had seen Sex and the City the night before. They have no social skills and they are silent. They are deadly. Those notes that he was taking? They were all about how you keep stealing stapler pins from the admin desk and how you are always browsing humor blogs when you should be working. These people annoy you because they ruin your image with the boss and can eventually lead you to quit when you realize the amount of hatred your boss has developed for you.”

On Twitter, there were tales of grime in people’s teeth, lying and blaming and one co-worker from hell who *gasp!* played that song “Call Me Maybe” twice a day.

Oh the horror. The humanity.

It’s one thing to show up with food in your teeth or Juicy printed on your butt. But we have to draw the line at Carly Rae Jepsen!

Psychologist Sherrie Bourg Carter offers this advice in “Psychology Today” for dealing with CFH’s (Coworkers From Hell):

  • Anticipate and be prepared
  • Don’t reinforce bad behavior
  • Don’t take it personally
  • Avoid direct attacks on the CFH, emotion, sarcasm and defensiveness
  • DO NOT engage
  • Practice reasoned responses to CFH behavior

 

Credit to CNBC for the original article.


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Five Career Lessons From TV’s ‘Friends’

There was a time in my life when I used to schedule my dates on a Friday night at 6.30pm in order to be home for the latest episode of Friends at 8pm.  The staff at my neighborhood haunt, Notting Grill, would smile knowingly at my routine, presenting the check the moment my dining partner placed down his fork.  The befuddled lad would inevitably wonder out aloud, as I skillfully ushered him out onto the street, why he wasn’t so much as offered the pudding menu.

Yes, such was my addiction to the show and the restaurant staff were only too happy to oblige as my enablers.

Friends has been off the air for some time – which makes me about ten years late in writing this – but sometimes a seriously random occurrence can get you full-swing reminiscing again. In my case, it was a monosyllabic, peroxide blonde Swiss DJ over New Year’s Eve in Davos, who bore an uncanny resemblance to the show’s Gunther, that did it.

Much like Mash and Seinfeld before it, Friends became firmly embedded in both the American and British psyche influencing popular culture and interpersonal dynamics. Interestingly, the show also presented plotlines with career lessons we could all take away.

Here’s my top five, leading up to number one:

5. The One Where Chandler Follows His Career Bliss (making a career switch when you’re more ‘mature’)

Chandler: I’ll just get my old job back.

Monica: No, I want you to have a job that you love. Not statistical analysis and data reconfiguration.

Chandler: I quit, and you learn what I do?

After years of plodding through a fairly mundane job, Chandler decides to make a risky mid-career industry move into something he may be more passionate about, but that means he’d need to start at the bottom again. He battles it out with a group of young interns all vying for the one prized paid position at an advertising agency. Initially struggling with the task of coming up with a slogan for a new pair of sneakers aimed at a youth market, he uses his age and experience to come up with an ingenious slogan that leaves the competition in dust.

Intern: … and then, at the end of the commercial, the girls get out of the hot tub and start making out with each other!

Boss: (ironic) That’s interesting! Just one thought: You didn’t mention the shoes. Who’s next? (Chandler raises his hand) Chandler…

Chandler: Okay… (He stands up) You start on the image of a guy putting on the shoes. He’s about my age…

Intern: (snorting) Your age?

Chandler: A-huh. So he’s rolling down the street and he starts to lose control, you know… maybe he falls… maybe hurts himself. Just then, a kid comes flying by wearing the shoes. He jumps over the old guy and laughs, and the line reads: “Not suitable for adults!”

Boss: Chandler, that’s great!

Chandler: Oh, thank you, sir… or man-who’s-two-years-younger-than-me (He sits down again)

Granted he came up with the slogan after injuring himself  while wearing the sneakers during the assignment, the result? He lands the job of junior copywriter when he only expected to receive an assistant position.

Sometimes maturity (life experience) can still trump youth.

4. The One Where Ross Dates His Student  (inappropriate workplace relationships)

Monica: Well, Ross, you be careful now. You don’t want to get a reputation as, you know, ‘Professor McNails-his-students.’

According to research, more than seven out of 10 professionals say they’re open to dating at work under the right circumstances.

Dating someone you work with certainly has its advantages and I know several happy couples who’ve met while working together, but chances are it may pose a greater risk to your professional reputation – especially if there is a hierarchical relationship in place (whether it’s professor-student in Ross’s case or between a supervisor-supervisee).

You may need to report the romance to the human resources department, according to Helaine Olen, co-author Office Mate: The Employee Handbook for Finding and Managing Romance on the Job, quoted in this Forbes article.In so doing, the supervisor should volunteer to take the hit if the company decides the pair should no longer work together.”

Uh oh – that budding, illicit office romance doesn’t sound quite as thrilling anymore, does it? Also consider the fact that it would be almost impossible to plan vacations at the same time, especially if you’re working in the same department or for a small company.

There’s a rather crude British expression advising against amorous workplace relations – but I’m much too coy to type it.

3. The One Where Rachel Returns After Maternity Leave (returning to work after an extended absence)

Rachel: What do you mean, you’re taking over my job.

Gavin: Well, while you were on your baby vacation, I was *doing* your job.

Mr. Zelner: When you left us, we weren’t sure what we were going to do. But then, Gavin to the rescue! Super Gavin!

Rachel: Well, that’s great, that’s great. So, now, uh, Super Gavin, when I come back, where do you plan on flying off to?

Gavin: Well, that’s up to Mr. Zelner. I’m sure he’ll make the right decision.

Rachel [under her breath]: Oh, wow, Super Ass Kissing Power.

Legally, under the Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), a woman who returns from maternity leave must be placed in the same job or an “equivalent” position. An equivalent position is a job having the same or similar pay, hours, work performed, work conditions, job responsibilities and job security.

But what if you’re competing against an aspiring co-worker who has used your absence (whether it’s maternity leave, a sabbatical etc.) to muscle his way into your role and the boss’s good books? This can be avoided – and I know that I stand the risk of drawing the wrath of new moms with this one – by simply staying in the game. Here’s two ways in which you can do this: Meet a colleague for coffee or lunch at the tail end of your leave to catch up on latest developments. This gives you the kind of workplace intel that wouldn’t show up in group e-mails and may give you the edge when you’re back at your desk.

Contact your line manager several weeks before your scheduled return date to discuss your transition back into the role. You may even consider dialing in for important project meeting-calls around a week or two prior to your return date, even if you don’t actively participate in the discussion itself.

2. The One Where Monica Fires Joey (how to gain the respect of colleagues)

Monica: Okay, could the waiters gather around to hear tonight’s specials? Okay, first, there’s, uh, Chilean Sea Bass, prepared with a mango relish, on a bed … why is nobody writing these down?

Waiter: Because we can remember them.

Monica: And because you’re all going to make up fake specials, and make me cook them like you did the other night?

Waiter: Well, sure, that too.

Monica is being treated shoddily by her new co-workers so she hires Joey just so she can fire him and show them that she could be a tough boss.

While co-opting a colleague to be part of your ruse to gain one-upmanship does offer comedic value (and a story to share with mates), it may be a bit drastic. Besides, the effect of one dramatic action to instantly gain respect would be ephemeral. It is far better to work over a period of time on gaining credibility through your actions and attitude, being an active listener, being someone who is true to their word (“Nothing worse than a hypocrite,” a friend recently reminded me) to truly earn the respect of colleagues.

And how to deal with undermining comments from colleagues in a day and age when the majority of our workplace communication (read: drama) takes place via e-mail or IMs?

According to Frances Cole Jones, author of The Wow Factor: The 33 Things You Must (and Must Not) Do to Guarantee Your Edge in Today’s Business World, “If you feel the offending colleague is using e-mail or other technology to wage his war, send a note saying, ‘I’d prefer to discuss this in person. What time works for you?’” she suggests. “You will be surprised how few people respond.”

And in number one place, the ‘top’ Friends lesson as it relates to career (sort of):

1. The One Where Rachel Chooses Ross (it’s just a job, not your life)

Ross: Oh my God! Did she get off the plane? Did she get off the plane?

Rachel: I got off the plane.

In this final Friends moment, between choosing a prestigious job of a lifetime in Paris which will take her away from the love of her life, Rachel ultimately chooses Ross.

I’m going to get a bit schmaltzy on you now, but as much as your career gives you satisfaction and validation, at the end of the day, it is only one component of your life. In the New York Times article, The Island Where People Forget To Die, the writer concludes that social connectivity is one of the pivotal links to contentment and life longevity. “For people to adopt a healthful lifestyle, I have become convinced, they need to live in an ecosystem, so to speak, that makes it possible. As soon as you take culture, belonging, purpose or religion out of the picture, the foundation for long healthy lives collapses. The power of such an environment lies in the mutually reinforcing relationships among lots of small nudges and default choices.”

Cultivate meaningful relationships with family and friends because – and you know what’s coming next… they’ll be there for you, even when the rain starts to pour.

 

Check out the original article, by Maseena Ziegler, over at Forbes.


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U.K. Finance Industry To Cut 43,000 Jobs As Grads Shun Sector

The U.K.’s financial industry will lose 43,000 jobs in six months, according to a forecast from the Confederation of British Industry, as companies shrink and reduce costs.

Banks, insurers, asset managers and other finance firms probably cut 25,000 positions in the last three months of 2012 and may eliminate 18,000 jobs in the first quarter of this year, according to a study by Britain’s biggest business lobby group and PriceWaterhouseCoopers, published Monday.

Global cuts at financial firms have exceeded 115,000 since 2012 as they seek to control compensation expenses and retreat from capital-intensive businesses, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

The cuts in the U.K. industry will mean about 132,000 financial-services jobs have been lost since the peak in the final quarter of 2008, when it employed about 1 million people, the CBI said.

In addition to firings, bankers have been retiring earlier and younger would-be recruits are shunning finance for less-tainted industries, said Burrowes.

For young professionals, ‘it’s not an attractive place to go’, he said. Banking and capital markets at his firm, PwC, ‘is not a sector they’re attracted to any longer’, Kevin Burrowes, U.K. financial-services leader at PwC,  said. ‘It used to be our most popular sector’.

Check out the original article over at Bloomberg.


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Master the changing face of job interviewing

The new trend in hiring in 2013? Challenge-based and video interviews. Read how you can master these new challenges.

Just when you got the hang of the in-person or phone interview, things are changing. According to HireArt, a company that helps employers make hires, the new trend in hiring in 2013 is utilizing challenge-based and video interviews.

“Businesses and recruiters are using video interviews and work samples as a way to effectively vet job candidates before bringing them in for an actual interview so employers can “try before they buy” and ensure they’re finding the right candidate for the job.”

For example, if a business is hiring an engineer, they may present a coding challenge to candidates; if they’re hiring a social media manager they may ask candidates to create compelling tweets.

Here are some tips from HireArt to ensure that candidates are prepared for both the challenge-based and video interviews that are becoming more common in today’s competitive job market.

1. Act like you want to be there.

Being energetic over a video interview can go a long way in making you stand out against other candidates that seem bored or uncomfortable. Even though it might be more difficult to seem enthusiastic about a job when you are just talking to the camera, you should try to come across as excited and passionate about why you want to be there.

2. Watch your presentation.

You don’t look as good on camera as you look in person (it’s true!). So, don’t let basic components of your interview, such as attire and lighting, negatively affect how you come across. Dress as you would dress were the interview taking place in the office. Record the view in a bright place that allows the interviewer to clearly see you. And make sure the quality of your audio allows the interviewer to really understand what you are saying. Although these things are not related to your skills, they could count against you when other candidates have them and you don’t.

3. Don’t be sloppy.

Typos and lack of attention to detail in your online applications often immediately disqualify you. Take the time to be careful!

4. Know your own pitch.

Most video interviews require you to record a two minute pitch about yourself. Really think about what you want to get across, what experiences you would like to highlight, what sets you apart from other candidates, and how you want to say this in a succinct way.

5. Make sure you know the company, its competitors and the industry inside and out.

If you are invited to an interview, even if it is an online interview, companies expect you to understand the position and know the company well. Use this information to craft your pitch and at every other chance you get. Articulate specifically why you want to work at the company – what specifically drew you to this position.

 

Find the full, original article written by Toni Bowers, over at TechRepublic.