Your Job List

The dangers of accepting a counter-offer

Leave a comment

You may think that getting and accepting a counter-offer from your company is flattering. You may have to think again.

It’s pretty tempting to think you’re quite the valuable commodity when your company offers you a higher salary to keep you from leaving to go work for another company. Not so fast, hot stuff. Here are a couple of things to think about before you accept that offer.

You will be looked on here on out as a bit of a traitor.

Sure, you ultimately decided to stay, but in your company’s eyes, you made an effort to find another job. And you might have interviewed on a day you called in sick, or asked to leave early using some excuse.

It may be a little naïve, but to your managers, your loyalty can’t be counted on. And if you were just using the other job offer as leverage to get what you wanted from your employer in the first place, it can be construed as a kind of blackmail. People don’t tend to forget that kind of thing, especially when promotions opportunities come around.

Money won’t solve your problems.

If you began looking for another job because you were unhappy for various reasons, you can be assured that a little bump in salary is not going to make those issues disappear.

You’ve burned a bridge with the company that wanted to hire you.

If you tell the manager of the second company who was making you an offer that you’ve decided to stay with your current company, he or she is going to take note. If you pulled the rug out from under them once, they’ll be very sure not to give you the opportunity in the future.

Last thoughts

By accepting a counteroffer from your company, you could be changing the dynamics of your relationship forever. And the counteroffer could just be buying time for your company until they can find your replacement–someone they feel will be glad to be where you are.

Credit to the guys over at TechRepublic for the original article.

Advertisements

Author: Ben Logan

Software Developer & Solution Architect, currently in the Financial Services domain.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s